Simone Knowing Simon S.

SimoneSimone Knowing Simon S. is the Specialist Adviser for the Italian team of the TAE project. He describes himself as “a 34 year old citizen of the world” and has been working in schools for 17 years, specialising in education and training, communication and learning methods. Simon holds two degrees in the Sciences and Technologies of Information and Communication from the University of Milan and he is studying for his third degree in Human and Social Sciences (Psychology). Simon is very involved in autism research and is always seeking new solutions on how to learn, understand and communicate about it.

 

  1. Tell us a little more about your work.

Principally, I’m a teacher and an educator: I work with some children with specific learning disabilities, especially dyslexia, and autism. I try to find good practice and ideas to develop teaching solutions suitable for all children who are entrusted to me. I’m also a consultant for some companies in problem solving, automatic communication, communication design and musical production in which my sensitive hearing is much appreciated.

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On World Autism Acceptance Day 2016, Simon gave a presentation called ‘Not Once-A-Year People’. To his right are seated TAE Italian team members Dr Paola Molteni and Dr Roberta Sala.

 

  1. What are your memories of school when you were between the ages of five and ten?

I have a really powerful long-term memory, so I remember a lot of things from my childhood. From primary school, I remember everything about the places, colours, smells and events. I recollect very little instead of the children who were with me, and even then only for some unpleasant episodes or details. For example, I remember the 27 Gig Tiger Electronic Games of A., the glitter pencils of M., the collapsible plastic lenses of P., or the label with my name on all common items such as bath soap or toothpaste, and things like that. In my mind, I can go back in time whenever I want and hear the sounds, the smells, the sensations of each event that I remember. This includes recreation, holidays, classroom laboratories and all the end of year school performances, which I recall with great precision: I remember all the music, lights, colours and the materials and positions on stage of the scenery etc.

‘I have a really powerful long-term memory (…). From primary school, I remember everything about the places, colours, smells and events.’

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‘Supermarket’ by Simon, reflects the sensory onslaught that can be experienced by autistic individuals.

 

3. What, in your opinion, do young children need if they are to thrive in mainstream schools?

Children need three things to thrive in mainstream schools: kindness, respect (from other children but principally from adults) and teachers who are not afraid to learn new things. Above all, perhaps the most important things is that teachers are not frightened when they hear the word “autism.” They must not be afraid of this word.

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Simon’s book ‘Paolo’ is written from the point of view of a 6 year-old autistic boy.

4. What do you hope to bring to the TAE project?

I’m very honoured to take part in the TAE project, and I wish to bring my perspective in the hope that this will add to the understanding of the Autism spectrum. I have dedicated my entire life to education and teaching, and I have seen and I have experienced many situations of being on the outside. Very often, I couldn’t do anything (or very little): when you’re a Mac in a Windows’ world, you end up alone, because between you and other people, it creates a wall of incomprehension that, combined with rigidity of thought, does not allow you to communicate your thoughts functionally. But this can’t be an excuse: any person can improve him or herself (perhaps not necessarily with the same tools as everyone else), and the purpose of people is to improve the future for those who come after them (as Darwin says…). I have tried to improve myself and I want to change things and bring my small contribution to building new pieces of society.

‘…when you’re a Mac in a Windows’ world, you end up alone, because between you and other people, it creates a wall of incomprehension…’

When some people are excluded, they are very aware of it, and that feeling is, I think, one of the worst feelings that you can experience. I want to grow old and to think that in my life I had been useful for someone: Today’s children? My future children? The future children of other people? It makes no difference.

 Thank you for the interview Simon and we look forward to your work with the TAE team in the future.

It will be a great honour. Thank you too. Best regards from Italy, and smiles. Simon.

Simon’s book ‘Paolo’ is also available in French.

World Autism Acceptance Day 2016

World Autism Acceptance Day (WAAD), also known as World Autism Awareness Day, can provide not only a useful mechanism through which to reconsider our priorities in the field of autism education, but motivate us to highlight aspects of our work which we hope are helping to improve the educational opportunities and longer term outcomes for autistic children.

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A primary school classroom in Greece

 

In Italy, members of the TAE team are participating in a two-day event on the 2nd and 3rd of April entitled ‘Autism: Strategies for Well-Being’. Consisting of talks, workshops and culminating in an autism-friendly film-screening, team members will also emphasise the ways in which the TAE project has sharpened the understanding and skills of different practitioners. One of the speakers at the event is ‘Simone Knowing Simon S.’, a well-known autistic advocate, trainer and consultant who is also a specialist advisor to the Italian TAE team. He will talk about how teachers can facilitate the inclusion of autistic children in the classroom.

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Participants at the Italian piloting sessions of the TAE training materials

 

In Greece, some of the TAE team are marking WAAD a little later in the month on 10th April at the Café Myrtillo, the first café in Greece to employ only autistic adults and those with other special educational needs and disabilities. The main speaker at this event will be Dr Damian Milton, who plays an important advisory role on the TAE project. His talk is entitled: ‘Creating autism-friendly societies’ and will be followed by a presentation on the TAE project itself by the Greek team lead, Katerina Laskaridou, leading to an open discussion. The event organisers have made this event open to the public, but have purposefully invited autistic adults and teenagers in order to emphasise the vital nature of their participation and input.

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Poster advertising the event at the café Myrtillo